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Issue 503/ 17th - 23rd Sept 2011

Front Page

Somaliland News

News Headlines

Fadumo Saeed Draws Attention To The Plight Of Homeless Children

Dr Ise Abdi Jama Urges Somaliland Physicians To Work Diligently, Warns Against Personal Attacks

Journalists Continue To Be Targeted In Somaliland

Local and Regional Affairs

Somaliland Appeals Court Confirms Fine For Newspaper Editor

Attackers Shoot Journalist In Somalia

Rwandan Artists Sing Their Big Hearts For Somalia

Air Raids Heard In Southern Somalia

Somalia Crisis Has Cost World $55 Billion Since 1991 - Report

Al-Shabaab Allows Turks To Deliver Relief

Three Terrorist Groups In Africa Pose Threat To U.S., American Commander Says

Editorial

The Business Of Famine In South Somalia

Features & Commentary

Session: Africa’s Challenge: South Sudan And Beyond

Twenty Years Of Collapse And Counting: The Cost Of Failure In Somalia

Somalia: On the Road to Recovery or Déjà vu?

Travelers Should Beware Of Pirates

A Man-Made Disaster: How Militant Islamism, The War Against Terror And Famine Are Connected In Somalia

International News

Opinion

Is There A Country Called “Somalia”? A Widespread Misconception

Etihad, This Amazing Airline Deserves Attention!

The Triumph Of Democracy And Good Governance In Somaliland

Current Status Of Forests And Woodlands In Somaliland: (Threats And Opportunities)

 

Wikileaks: Ethiopia Proposed ‘Semi-Recognition’ For Somaliland

A leaked Cable of US Embassy Addis Ababa shows Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi lobbying for a ‘semi-recognition’ status for Somaliland.

In a January 30, 2009 meeting with Assistant Secretary Phil Carter, the Ethiopia Premier was quoted as saying that:

“he(Meles) has already broached the notion of an interim- or semi-recognition, along the lines of what the Palestinian Authority enjoys, with Somaliland President Kahin Riyale, and that Riyale has become increasingly receptive to the strategy……the next steps must be for others in the international community to help convince the Somalilanders of such an approach.

Meles argued that granting a "semi-recognition" for Somaliland would be ‘a critical step necessary to enhance the international community’s ability to support Somaliland on regional security/stability and in its own domestic efforts toward democratization.’ He stressed further that ‘the international community’s status quo relationship with Somaliland is untenable and that Somaliland needs a way around the issue of legal recognition to allow the international community to "recognize some authority within Somaliland with which it can engage”.’

While accepting the Assistant Secretary’s criticism of Somaliland’s internal political dynamics in the prior two years and the need to hold credible elections as planned, Meles Zenawi insisted that ‘Somaliland’s democratic process cannot be sustained without some kind of interim recognition which can allow for the provision of international assistance to bolster Somaliland’s own democratic process.’ [Note that the 2010 Presidential election went as planned and Somaliland managed a peaceful transfer of power to an opposition party, albeit with some hitched in ...]

However, Somaliland needs a "good sponsor" within the African community to advance the cause, Meles observed. Speaking of potential sponsors, Meles suggested that:

Djibouti would be the best choice, and acknowledged that Ethiopia would be the worst (as the move risked only fueling detractors’ arguments that Ethiopia is bent on breaking up Somalia).

Once the support of Africans is secured, ‘the onus would be on the U.S. and UK to make the Somaliland semi-recognition case to the Europeans and others in the international community’, Meles outlined the strategy.

Read the Cable below.

********************

Reference ID – 09ADDISABABA260 
Created – 2009-02-02 14:31 
Released – 2011-08-30 01:44 
Classification – CONFIDENTIAL 
Origin – Embassy Addis Ababa 
VZCZCXRO0925 
OO RUEHDE RUEHROV RUEHTRO 
DE RUEHDS #0260 0331431 
ZNY CCCCC ZZH 
O 021431Z FEB 09 
FM AMEMBASSY ADDIS ABABA 
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 3588 
INFO RUCNSOM/SOMALIA COLLECTIVE PRIORITY 
RUZEFAA/HQ USAFRICOM STUTTGART GE PRIORITY 
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY 
RUEPADJ/CJTF HOA PRIORITY 
RUEKDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY 
RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY 
RHEHAAA/NSC WASHDC PRIORITY 
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY 
C O N F I D E N T I A L ADDIS ABABA 000260 
SIPDIS 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 01/30/2018 
TAGS: PREL PGOV SO ET

SUBJECT: ETHIOPIA MAKES CASE FOR SOMALILAND "SEMI-RECOGNITION" 
Classified By: Ambassador Donald Yamamoto for reasons 1.4 (b) and (d).

1. (C) On the margins of a discussion with Acting AF Assistant Secretary Phil Carter On January 30, Ethiopia Prime Minister Meles made the case for "semi-recognition" of Somaliland as a critical step necessary to enhance the international community’s ability to support Somaliland on regional security/stability and in its own domestic efforts toward democratization. Meles argued that the international community’s status quo relationship with Somaliland is untenable and that Somaliland needs a way around the issue of legal recognition to allow the international community to "recognize some authority within Somaliland with which it can engage."

2. (C) Meles accepted Acting A/S Carter’s argument that Somaliland’s internal political dynamics over the past two years have not helped their case, and agreed that the region must get back on track and hold credible elections as planned this spring. Still Meles argued that Somaliland’s democratic process cannot be sustained without some kind of interim recognition which can allow for the provision of international assistance to bolster Somaliland’s own democratic process.

3. (C) Meles noted that he has already broached the notion of an interim- or semi-recognition, along the lines of what the Palestinian Authority enjoys, with Somaliland President Kahin Riyale, and that Riyale has become increasingly receptive to the strategy. Meles argued to Carter that the next steps must be for others in the international community to help convince the Somalilanders of such an approach. Then, Somaliland needs a "good sponsor" within the African community to advance the cause. Meles suggested that Djibouti would be the best choice, and acknowledged that Ethiopia would be the worst (as the move risked only fueling detractors’ arguments that Ethiopia is bent on breaking up Somalia). Once the strategy had support among African states, Meles argued that the onus would be on the U.S. and UK to make the Somaliland semi-recognition case to the Europeans and others in the international community.

YAMAMOTO 






 


 



 



 

 


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